Transgender taboos: Don't question ... or else

by John Stonestreet And Roberto Rivera , Christian Post Contributor |

(Photo: REUTERS/Francois Lenoir)Participants stand under a rainbow umbrella as they attend the Belgian lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) Pride Parade in Brussels, Belgium, May 16, 2015.

There are a growing number of people who transitioned from one gender to the other, only to regret it, and then try to reverse the process. Why aren't we hearing their stories?

Here's a fun fact: the word "taboo" came to the English language from natives on what is now the nation of Tonga. Believe it or not, when British explorer James Cook first visited the remote island, he noticed that certain things, in particular certain foods, were strictly off-limits. When he asked why, they replied these things were "taboo," which meant "consecrated, inviolable, forbidden, unclean or cursed."

Now in English parlance today, we tend to use the word "taboo" as a figure of speech or hyperbole. We don't think of whatever is being referred to as literally being "consecrated," "inviolable," "uncleaned" or "cursed."

Or do we?

A recent article in Canada's National Post identified something it called the "new taboo." It's off-limits to even talk about the increasing number of people who, having undergone gender-reassignment surgery, now not only regret their decision, they want to reverse the procedure.

Five years ago, Dr. Miroslav Djordjevic, described in the article as "the world-leading genital reconstructive surgeon," met a patient who had undergone the male-to-female surgery at another clinic but now wanted it reversed.

It turned out to be only the first of many stories Djordjevic would hear "about crippling levels of depression following their transition, and, in some cases, even contemplated suicide." He told the National Post "It can be a real disaster to hear these stories."

Why then are these disaster stories so rarely heard? Because they are taboo.

The very same article told readers about allegations that Bath Spa University in England turned down "an application for research on gender reassignment reversal" because the project was deemed 'potentially politically incorrect.'" Or perhaps a more accurate word would be the one chosen by the National Post: "taboo."

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